Wednesday, 16 May 2018

Rumbelow, Denby Dale

History

The River Dearne reaches the A635 Barnsley Road bridge at Denby Dale. Below the bridge, the Munchcliffe Beck joins, and there is a large millpond, which supplied mills at Denby Dale.
 
In 1932 a typhoid outbreak killed 12 people in Denby Dale from contaminated water in Square Wood reservoir. Some years earlier water closests had been installed for houses at Quaker Bottom and the sewer drainage from these houses was made to discharge in to the Munchcliffe Beck.
 
Source:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Dearne
https://www.examiner.co.uk/lifestyle/family-history-80-years-typhoid-4941303
 
Esoteric Eric

















Tuesday, 8 May 2018

Xenomorph, Sheffield

History

A 200m culverted section of the Meersbrook just upstream from the infall of the 'Stoopatron', featuring lots of strange ochre tinted calcifications.

Esoteric Eric









Thursday, 19 April 2018

Event Horizon, Oldham

History

Situated near Ravenstone Brow & Dovestones reservoir is this 10ft tunnel, constructed to bypass water from the Greenfield Brook and the reservoir from Holme Clough via into the nearby Dovestones reservoir.

Constructed from dressed stone & brick, the tunnel was rock-blasted through the mountain at a length of approximately 1.2 miles.
 
Source:
https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/threads/event-horizon-april-2011.60007/
 
Esoteric Eric
 








 

Thursday, 5 April 2018

Empire Theatre, Burnley

History

The Empire Theatre on St James Street, Burnley was built for W. C. Horner of the Victoria Opera House in Burnley and designed by the architect G. B. Rawcliffe, who had previously designed the Victoria Opera House in Burnley. The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people.

In 1911 the respected Theatre Architect, Bertie Crewe reconstructed the auditorium with a new seating capacity of 2,100, and it is Crewe's auditorium that remains to this day despite several changes of use and recent serious neglect.
 
During its days as a Palace of Variety music hall acts from all over the world performed in the Empire, including global superstars like Houdini. During WWII the Old Vic and Sadlers Wells Ballet also moved to Burnley to its sister theatre the Old Vic for some years.

In 1938 The Theatre was altered again for cinema use by the Architects Lewis and Company of Liverpool, and the seating capacity was reduced to 1,808 in the process. As a state of the art cinema it hosted films like Rock around the Clock and gave many fond memories to cinema goers for many years before finally closing as a live venue in the 60s.

​Like so many other Theatres around the Country the Empire was eventually converted for Bingo use but even this ceased in 1995 and the Theatre, despite being a Grade II Listed building, has been empty ever since, and is in serious decline, and listed as one of the Theatres Trust's buildings at risk.
 
Source:
http://burnleyempiretheatretrust.weebly.com/about-the-burnley-empire.html
 
Esoteric Eric