Tuesday, 21 November 2017

Thurgoland Tunnel, Sheffield

History

Thurgoland Tunnel is a double-bore abandoned railway tunnel between Penistone and Wortley. Its total length is 924 feet (282 m). The original tunnel, a single bore carrying two tracks, was opened in 1845 on the Sheffield, Ashton-Under-Lyne and Manchester Railway between Manchester Store Street and Sheffield.
 
It is characterised by a curve of 60 chains (4,000 ft; 1,200 m) radius on a falling gradient of 1 in 131. Due to the difficulties in laying the original tunnel out, it consists of a series of straight sections in a series of erratic curves varying in radius from 100 to 20 chains (6,600 to 1,300 ft; 2,010 to 400 m). Maximum clearance was only obtained by reducing the normal six-foot spacing between the tracks.
 
Because of the clearance problems the original construction caused for the planned LNER electrification, and because opening-out was deemed too expensive, in 1948 a second single-line tunnel was built for the up line and the old tunnel was converted to carry only the down line. As this project was begun in 1947 just before railway nationalisation (British Railways), each of the up tunnel portals host twin dates, with "LNER 1947" inscribed in the central parapet panel at the top of the portals and "BR 1948" below in the keystone. Due to the anticipated interim period of steam working before Woodhead New Tunnel was completed, a cast-iron smokeplate lined the roof of the tunnel to protect the concrete lining. Electric working commenced in 1954 and ceased in 1981.
 
The tunnels ceased to carry trains in 1983 when the local Sheffield–Huddersfield train service was diverted via Barnsley.
 
The up tunnel, being much newer, has been re-utilised for a walking trail, whilst the down bore has been blocked off.
 
Source:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thurgoland_Tunnel
 
Esoteric Eric
 







 

Sunday, 19 November 2017

Silica Bricks Ganister Mine, Sheffield

History

Ganister (or Gannister) was mined for its use in the manufacture of silica bricks (often called 'refractories'; materials that maintain strength at high temperatures), used to line industrial furnaces. For a short period of time in the late 1800s - mid 1900s, Ganister mining was a significant industry in parts of Sheffield.

Located in woodland to the North of the city, this particular mine was likely to have been owned by the Silica Fire Brick company, who had a factory nearby in Oughtibridge. The mine was part of a large complex of mines located in the area, on the west facing slope of the Don Valley. The relative height of the mines in these woods allowed gravity to be used to help transport produce to the railway below.
 
Source:
https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/silica-bricks-ganister-mine-sheffield-november-2017.t110733
 
Esoteric Eric
 








 

Sunday, 12 November 2017

RAF Coningsby Bomb Dump, Lincolnshire

History

When the Tornado F3 went out of service, the RAF had planned to shut the bomb dump temporarily until the Typhoon came into service - and then it would be re-opened. In that interim period metal thieves caused so much damage from the removal of copper from the lightning protection system (LPS), that it was more cost effective for the RAF to build a brand new facility rather than repair the old.
 
Source:
http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/topic/11971-raf-coningsby-weapons-store-october-2017/
 
Esoteric Eric
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Thursday, 9 November 2017

Minitron, Sheffield

History

Minitron is a short culvert that lies beneath Kelham Island. The entire island on which the brewery is now located is man-made, resulting from mill race in the 12th century (around 1180) when water from the River Don was required for power. The goit was created to carry water from the River Don all the way to Lady’s Bridge, where the Town Corn Mill – which belonged to the Lord of the Manor – was located. Only a small section continues to exist today. It is rumoured that the island is named after Kellam Homer, the town’s armourer and smithy in 1637 who owned a small workshop on the land. Homer was able to expand his premises on account of the goit, as he was able to set up a waterwheel for his grinding workshop on the island. In later years the diverted section of the river was also used to supply power to a number of other metalwork factories which emerged in the same area as the former corn mill.

By the 1800’s, as the city of Sheffield expanded, the Kelham Island area and the island itself became a host for many different manufacturers. John Crowley was one notable figure who purchased the island in 1829. A small iron foundry, known as the Kelham Island Works, was constructed on the site and the premises soon became a popular producer of iron products; these ranged from things as diverse as lawn mowers, bicycles, corn grinders and decorative items. Due to the success of his business, Crowley moved to the Meadow Hall area in 1870. The site was subsequently bought by the City in the 1890s and most of the Iron Works Buildings were demolished to make way for an electricity generating station, to provide power to the City’s new tram system. During this time major changes occurred across the city and much of the original goit was redeveloped. The remaining sections were culverted over time, particularly after the 1930s when the power station was closed down, and the same buildings steadily became workshops and storage space once again. Those formers buildings now house the Kelham Island Museum and Brewery.
 
Source:
https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/minitron-sheffield-october-2015.t100337
 
Esoteric Eric